5 Interior Design Trends For 2020

Posted on February 19, 2020 by Katie Shapiro

With a new year underway, many of the interior design trends that have had a strong footprint in the Roaring Fork Valley in the recent past — think mountain modern and monochromatic grey on grey palettes — are already on their way out. And while many of us are still focused on New Year’s resolutions dedicated to personal refreshes, the dawn of a new decade is also the perfect time to consider updating your home. Whether you’re contemplating a one room revamp or embarking on a new property project, we tapped five of the leading local interior design experts to share what’s caught their eye most and what clients are asking for in 2020:

 

OPEN FLOOR PLANS, WARMER TONES

Kristin Dittmar Doremus

Kristin Dittmar Design

Courtesy Kristin Dittmar Design

The main changing trend I’m seeing is adding shades of brown. As a designer, I am seeing that more people are interested in warmer tones and a beige/brown finish provides comfort and coziness to a home. Especially looking at flooring, a natural wood finish is just so beautiful and adds warmth to a home. Clients tend to like open floor plans; we have been remodeling a lot of homes and an open floor plan is almost a must. I think people like it because it makes a home more welcoming. Instead of each room being designed for a single task, these spaces are now used for multiple activities and users are able spend time together as a family and entertain guests. 616 E. Hyman Ave., Suite 201, Aspen, 970.300.4688, KristinDittmarDesign.com

 

IN-HOME SPAS

Luis Menendez

Menendez Architects

Luis Menendez Architecture: Photo by Patricia Martinez Arquitetura

We have been getting more requests from clients for amenities usually found in spas. The requests are an extension of current lifestyle choices that have a greater focus on health and wellness. Our approach to meeting these new found interests is multifaceted and the features we are incorporating in many of the new projects take different forms. Many of our designs now contain a fitness room that accommodates a variety of exercise equipment and space for yoga. Dedicated massage rooms, designed to enhance a relaxing experience, allows for a getaway within the home. While steam rooms are still the preferred sauna type in our environment, dry heat saunas are making a comeback and we have incorporated them in two recent projects. Indoor swimming pools and indoor multi-person whirlpools are also popular, along with cold plunge pools. Indoor air quality is also essential to enhancing the wellness aspect of the interiors. Selecting finishes and furnishings made of natural materials with low VOC finishes is critical to preserving the air quality. To further enhance the air quality at our high altitude, there is now the option of using central oxygen delivery systems. Blackout shades to promote better and longer sleep are the new standard in every bedroom. 715 W. Main St., Suite 104, Aspen, 970.544.4851, MenendezArchitects.com 

 

FUN WITH WALLPAPER

Denise Taylor

Cathers Home

 

Courtesy Cathers Home

Each space we design is unique and personal to each client. We love getting to know our clients and helping their mountain home come to life. An interior design trend we are having fun with is the addition of wallpaper in spaces to add visual interest, layer in texture and be playful in the space. The wallpaper we all remember growing up has been replaced with inspiring designs and textures. The wallpaper of yesteryear was a commitment that was very hard to remove if you got tired of the design and pattern. Now, Benjamin Moore has a new primer that makes wallpaper easy to remove should you decide to change the design or function of a space, thus making the wallpaper experience way more fun. 530 Basalt Ave., Basalt, 970.927.6556, CathersHome.com

 

EUROPEAN MODERN

Kim Raymond

Kim Raymond Architecture + Interiors

 

Courtesy Kim Raymond Architecture + Interiors

We at Kim Raymond Architecture + Interiors see a turning towards the modern looks that are coming from Europe. Sleek, high performance kitchens; modern furniture that is comfortable to sit on, not just cool to look at in photographs; and amazing light fixtures. Our clients are embracing the idea that lights are the “jewelry of the home” and manufacturers are providing a vast array of interesting options. The materials and colors are being mixed more now than ever. We see two and even three metals combined gracefully into one fixture as designers are getting more bold in their use of materials. 418 E. Cooper Ave., Suite 201, Aspen, 970.925.2252, KimRaymondArchitects.com

 

INDOOR-OUTDOOR CONNECTION 

John Rowland + Sarah Broughton

Rowland + Broughton

 

Courtesy Rowland + Broughton

Search “biophilia” and you’ll find references as far afield as Icelandic singer Björk’s album by that name, exploring the links between nature, music, and technology. Go deeper, and you’ll discover that psychoanalyst Erich Fromm popularized the term in the 1960s, coining “bio,” meaning “life” and “philia,” meaning “friendly feeling toward,” to describe the biological drive toward self-preservation. In the late 1970s, American biologist Edward O. Wilson expanded on the meaning, using it to describe “the rich natural pleasure that comes from being surrounded by living organisms.” Now you’ll find explanations and ruminations about biophilia as it relates to architecture and interior design today. Design firms worldwide, including Rowland + Broughton, are emphasizing the importance of connecting with the natural environment in their work. Encouraging personal well being by strengthening the indoor-outdoor connection in homes has become second nature, shall we say. Establishing an environment that is pleasing to the eye, soothing to the psyche, and physically comforting. As a concept, biophilic design may incorporate numerous elements and practices, such as: 

  • Providing direct connections to the outdoors via panoramic bifold door systems, terraces and decks
  • Encouraging natural light through well-positioned windows, doors and skylights
  • Utilizing natural materials, finishes and furnishings
  • Incorporating the element of water by integrating natural streams or ponds, or designing water features and/or pools
  • Incorporating the warming element of fire with the addition of fireplaces or firepits
  • Creating abundant green areas, such as outdoor gardens and greenhouses or indoor living walls

The end result; healthy lifestyles, nurturing environments. 500 W. Main St., Aspen, 970.544.9006, RowlandandBroughton.com

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Mastering Mega-Remakes

Posted on January 13, 2020 by Katie Shapiro

Mega spec homes — large projects primarily built by developers for immediate resale—have everything…except buyers. While the Aspen Snowmass market outperformed 2018 in terms of sales volume by 5% in 2019, the supply for high-end luxury homes valued at over $10 million has reached a six year supply at the current absorption rate. 

 

Instead, new buyers of homes falling into the 10,000 square foot plus range are tackling large-scale residential renovations as an often less expensive and more customizable workaround. Enter Pembrooke & Ives, the Manhattan based interior design firm that specializes in overhauling massive residences into bespoke multigenerational secondary homes.

We talked to Francis Nicdao, one of Pembrooke & Ives’ design directors, to see how the firm approaches such mammoth remakes, two of which were recently completed nearby.

What is the typical timeline for projects of this scale?

Pre-construction is usually six months, with anywhere between 18 to 24 months of construction.

Outdoor sofas and dining table by David Sutherland; chairs by Janus et Cie.
Photo credit: JC Buck

Where do you begin with the renovation process?

Both of these homes were renovations for new buyers. In approaching the design process at this scale, it is really important to understand how the client wants to use the house, their lifestyle and their overall wish list. We also examine how they are currently living in their existing home(s) and start the personalization process from there. 

The living room features a Ferrell Mittman sofa and lounge chairs, custom coffee table by Pembrooke & Ives), Hudson Furniture nickel side table, and sculptures by Fernando Botero.
Photo credit: David Marlow

What interior strategy is essential when sourcing accessories and furniture?


Scale is critical. You need furniture that does not feel dwarfed by the architecture. Oftentimes, in these cases, bigger is better. Aspen lends itself to furniture that has texture and that is made from natural materials used in a modern application. Because there is such an indoor-outdoor connection in these homes, we also have to be sensitive to the fact that the home will feel different in the summer versus the winter, and that the furniture and finishes should feel relevant and appropriate in all seasons.

Kelly Wearstler custom chairs accent the dining room and surround a custom dining table by Pembrooke & Ives. 
Photo credit: JC Buck

What do you love most about working on homes in Aspen?

It’s such a special place, and the view of Aspen Mountain from both homes on Red Mountain is spectacular. Working in this setting is an exciting challenge for us; with a large focus of our business on urban residences and buildings, it is a great opportunity to be able to infuse our style and expertise into a mountain-specific home. We also always appreciate working alongside the local contractors and architects here who we have found to be incredibly professional and proficient.What was the inspiration behind each project?

Cobalt Mark Albrecht pendents accent a Kenya black stone bar and backsplash. 
Photo credit: JC Buck

Willoughby Way (nine bedrooms, 20,000 square feet) was for a couple who live in a formal, more traditional way. They wanted a contemporary design that felt glamorous, and we wanted to pay respect to the architecture by using clean lines and very luxurious materials. We used a beautiful onyx stone throughout, alongside warmer tones of wood and metal, and soft lighting to create more intimate spaces. The home is both comfortable and elegant, with layers of materials and textures that give it a certain richness.

 The master bathroom tub was crafted from polished Taj Mahal stone. 
Photo credit: JC Buck

Aspen Modern (four levels, 14,000 square feet, sleeps 28) was for a young family that loves to entertain in a more casual way. They wanted every space to feel comfortable and easy to live in. We really stripped everything back and installed larger windows to take in the expansive views. We used what would traditionally be used in mountain homes, but in a more refined and tailored fashion. The thoughtful juxtaposition of materials was also crucial—using chiseled stone against polished marble. Natural materials like the stone and wood beams brings an element of the outdoors in, but the strong geometry and clean lines keeps it modern. 

 

A custom bed by Pembrooke & Ives in the guest master bedroom sits next to the existing fireplace. 
Photo credit: JC Buck

This feature originally appeared in the Holiday Issue of Aspen Magazine. Pick up a copy around town, find it online at mlaspen.com, and follow socially @aspenmagazine.

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Categories: Local Architecture

Selling Sustainability

Posted on August 27, 2018 by Katie Shapiro

Photo Courtesy: Aspen Core

In a place tucked into one of the most majestic pockets of the world—surrounded by natural beauty, national forest land and protected open space—living green is the way of life. With renewable energy roots dating back to the 1980s when the city built the Maroon Creek and Ruedi hydroelectric plants, Aspen is undoubtedly a model citizen in how communities can reduce the carbon footprint of its residents. 

In 2015, Aspen reached a major milestone in achieving 100 percent renewable energy to power its electric utility—the third city in the nation to reach such a designation. While the City of Aspen’s Climate Action Office leads the charge, the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) —an independent non-profit organization— has helped teach Roaring Fork Valley residents how to conserve energy in their own homes. In 2000, this became the first program of its kind in the world. 

Funded in part by the Renewable Energy Mitigation Program (REMP), CORE distributes funds in the form of rebates and grants and has awarded more than $8.2 million to the community for smart energy compliance. In 2011, CORE launched its official home energy assessment program to increase efficiency awareness and implementation even more. 

With Aspen Snowmass Sotheby’s International Realty's prospective homebuyers weighing sustainability in their purchasing decisions now more than ever, we reached out to CORE’s Kate Henion, BPI (Building Performance Institute) building analyst and marketing manager for her advice. Here are Kate’s top tips to help clients going through the process of selling or buying a property in Pitkin County:

  1. A home energy assessment is the first step. The assessment looks at the whole picture of your home— heating systems, windows and insulation levels. It provides you with a comprehensive report outlining opportunities for energy improvements that are specific to your home. Plus, homeowners get free “quick fix” installations and combustion analysis testing.
  2. Once you get the report, give CORE a call to go over the top priorities for the home. CORE offers free energy advising and cash-back rebates and its knowledgeable Energy Advisors can connect you with local, qualified contractors and help you with utility rebates.
  3. Easy projects to knock-off first include air sealing & insulation. By air sealing and insulating your home correctly, you can establish a thermal boundary, heating and cooling only your desired living spaces.
      • Swapping out your incandescents for LEDs is another no-brainer, considering they use 75% less energy.  
      • Controls, like programmable thermostats, can save on your monthly utility bills. Smart thermostats provide you with those same savings, but with the added convenience of controlling your home by phone.

Since the program’s inception, CORE has performed 2,106 assessments and issued 1,380 rebates in the Roaring Fork Valley. Homeowners are eligible for up to $1,000 in rebates for energy efficiency upgrades, up to $5,250 for renewable energy, and larger properties are offered custom rebates. 

Thanks to Aspen’s forward-thinking approach to sustainability and the work being done by organizations like CORE, new-build homes are also incorporating environmentally-conscious design elements from the start. One standout example of just how green a residential project can get? “Game On,” the personal home of John Rowland and Sarah Broughton, principals of their eponymous, award-winning architecture and interior design firm Rowland + Broughton. 

Spanning 4,291 square feet on a small parcel in Aspen’s idyllic West End, the “modern interpretation of the historic homes from the turn-of-the-century that comprise much of the neighborhood” is LEED Gold Certified—the most widely used green building rating system and a globally recognized symbol of sustainability achievement.

It’s a rare residential designation, with commercial buildings more commonly applying for LEED Certified status, but one that the couple decided to take on themselves. 

Exterior TerraceLiving

Inside John Rowland and Sarah Broughton’s LEED certified dream home of their own in Aspen’s West End neighborhood. Courtesy: Rowland + Broughton

“We wanted to put our money where our mouths are with this particular project. Sustainability is in our firm’s DNA,” says Rowland.  

Siting the home strategically to avoid energy-draining appliances like an air conditioning system in favor of cross ventilation, he adds, “We went to great lengths on our insulation, so not only do we have a really tight envelope, but the house stays very cool all summer long.”

Also mindful of indoor air quality, Rowland explains that in selecting interior materials, “It means really understanding every little nuance that goes into the production and that no chemicals are ever used to avoid off-gas. Start by asking where the materials are coming from … are these supply companies green leaders in their own right? Do they practice sustainability in the harvesting of their raw materials?”

 

EntryLivingMasterHistoric Neighborhood

Inside John Rowland and Sarah Broughton’s LEED certified dream home of their own in Aspen’s West End neighborhood. Courtesy: Rowland + Broughton

Inventive elements like a gravel and sand bocce ball court in the backyard that doubles as a water filtration system for the home were matched with more traditional energy-saving tools like LED lighting and solar panels by Carbondale-based company, Sunsense.

Now, nearly three years after completing a dream home of their very own, Rowland is proud to report that, “We haven’t replaced a lightbulb since we moved in."

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The New Mountain Contemporary

Posted on October 6, 2017 by Katie Shapiro

For the past decade or so, the Aspen Snowmass real estate market has been dominated by two prevailing architecture styles: the traditional mountain look, or on the opposite extreme, contemporary. But according to one of our top-producing agents Andrew Ernemann, the needle has tipped so far in the direction of contemporary, that buyers are now looking for a mix of both — what he calls “The New Mountain Contemporary.”

How did we arrive at this new aesthetic? Local builders and esteemed architects are finding ways to marry the best of both.

Traditional mountain homes like 18 Cascade Lane in the Five Trees neighborhood in Aspen with dramatic log beams, wood paneling, exposed beams and heavy textiles are still highly sought after by homeowners seeking the quintessential Colorado Rocky Mountain home.

18 Cascade Lane is listed by Craig Morris for $6,750,000. Photo by Mountain Home Photo.

On the other end of the spectrum is 930 West Hallam Street in West Aspen — new construction with clean lines, large windows and an open floor plan.

930 West Hallam Street is listed by Lex Tarumianz for $5,995,000. Photo by Lightform 3D.

Situated between these extremes is 62 Bennett Court —a five bedroom spec home in the famed Red Mountain neighborhood designed by Denver-based Mountain Contemporary Architects with interiors finished by Aspen-based Kristin Dittmar Design.

62 Bennett Court is listed by Andrew Ernemann for $9,825,000. Photo by Mountain Home Photo.

Ernemann explains, “This home in particular—the finishes really resonate across the board with this style we’re seeing continually evolve. When you walk in, it feels clean and certainly new. There’s amazing light coming in from all sides and looking beyond the kitchen and dining room into the living room, the barn wood wall [with a built-in TV and fireplace] bring rustic elements into the modern mix. It’s a subtle reminder that you’re in the mountains.”

328 Deer Ridge Lane in Snowmass Village also seamlessly blends contemporary floor to ceiling windows, a white and grey palette, and an open floor plan against reclaimed wood and raw stone accents.  

328 Deer Ridge Lane is listed by Garrett Reuss for $4,975,000. Photo by Mountain Home Photo.

“Buyers in this market are seeking a fresh look to meld with the classic mountain lifestyle that they grew up with,” says Garrett Reuss. “This home combines the timeless aesthetic features of rustic stone and reclaimed wood and combines it with a light and open plan for a more modern, sophisticated style.”

And, perhaps, the trend is not just local. In Quebec, Canada 647 Rue Chapleau is a Scandinavian-inspired home in the Mont-Saint-Hilaire area. White walls, an open staircase and contemporary furnishings are blended with a floor to ceiling fireplace and exposed beams.

647 Rue Chapleau is listed with Sotheby’s International Realty Québec for $725,000 Canadian dollars ($580,418 US). Photo by Sotheby’s International Realty Québec.

Partner of Aspen-based CCY Architects Rich Carr agrees with Ernemann’s overall observation and explains, “The stylistic pendulum has swung back and forth—from cliché mountain traditional to quite clean modern and now trying to find a balance in between.”

Carr adds, “We’ve always focused on creating architecture that marries the best of modernism and regionalism; not mimicking the past, whether it’s traditional or modern, but creating original design solutions that embody contemporary lifestyles, and at the same time, speak to the richness, textures and traditions of Aspen and the Rockies. It’s been very gratifying to see the market leaning that way more than ever.”

Special thanks to:

Sotheby's International Realty Québec

 

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Categories: Local Architecture

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