Elevated Living Blog

5 Interior Design Trends For 2020

Posted on February 19, 2020 by Katie Shapiro

With a new year underway, many of the interior design trends that have had a strong footprint in the Roaring Fork Valley in the recent past — think mountain modern and monochromatic grey on grey palettes — are already on their way out. And while many of us are still focused on New Year’s resolutions dedicated to personal refreshes, the dawn of a new decade is also the perfect time to consider updating your home. Whether you’re contemplating a one room revamp or embarking on a new property project, we tapped five of the leading local interior design experts to share what’s caught their eye most and what clients are asking for in 2020:

 

OPEN FLOOR PLANS, WARMER TONES

Kristin Dittmar Doremus

Kristin Dittmar Design

Courtesy Kristin Dittmar Design

The main changing trend I’m seeing is adding shades of brown. As a designer, I am seeing that more people are interested in warmer tones and a beige/brown finish provides comfort and coziness to a home. Especially looking at flooring, a natural wood finish is just so beautiful and adds warmth to a home. Clients tend to like open floor plans; we have been remodeling a lot of homes and an open floor plan is almost a must. I think people like it because it makes a home more welcoming. Instead of each room being designed for a single task, these spaces are now used for multiple activities and users are able spend time together as a family and entertain guests. 616 E. Hyman Ave., Suite 201, Aspen, 970.300.4688, KristinDittmarDesign.com

 

IN-HOME SPAS

Luis Menendez

Menendez Architects

Luis Menendez Architecture: Photo by Patricia Martinez Arquitetura

We have been getting more requests from clients for amenities usually found in spas. The requests are an extension of current lifestyle choices that have a greater focus on health and wellness. Our approach to meeting these new found interests is multifaceted and the features we are incorporating in many of the new projects take different forms. Many of our designs now contain a fitness room that accommodates a variety of exercise equipment and space for yoga. Dedicated massage rooms, designed to enhance a relaxing experience, allows for a getaway within the home. While steam rooms are still the preferred sauna type in our environment, dry heat saunas are making a comeback and we have incorporated them in two recent projects. Indoor swimming pools and indoor multi-person whirlpools are also popular, along with cold plunge pools. Indoor air quality is also essential to enhancing the wellness aspect of the interiors. Selecting finishes and furnishings made of natural materials with low VOC finishes is critical to preserving the air quality. To further enhance the air quality at our high altitude, there is now the option of using central oxygen delivery systems. Blackout shades to promote better and longer sleep are the new standard in every bedroom. 715 W. Main St., Suite 104, Aspen, 970.544.4851, MenendezArchitects.com 

 

FUN WITH WALLPAPER

Denise Taylor

Cathers Home

 

Courtesy Cathers Home

Each space we design is unique and personal to each client. We love getting to know our clients and helping their mountain home come to life. An interior design trend we are having fun with is the addition of wallpaper in spaces to add visual interest, layer in texture and be playful in the space. The wallpaper we all remember growing up has been replaced with inspiring designs and textures. The wallpaper of yesteryear was a commitment that was very hard to remove if you got tired of the design and pattern. Now, Benjamin Moore has a new primer that makes wallpaper easy to remove should you decide to change the design or function of a space, thus making the wallpaper experience way more fun. 530 Basalt Ave., Basalt, 970.927.6556, CathersHome.com

 

EUROPEAN MODERN

Kim Raymond

Kim Raymond Architecture + Interiors

 

Courtesy Kim Raymond Architecture + Interiors

We at Kim Raymond Architecture + Interiors see a turning towards the modern looks that are coming from Europe. Sleek, high performance kitchens; modern furniture that is comfortable to sit on, not just cool to look at in photographs; and amazing light fixtures. Our clients are embracing the idea that lights are the “jewelry of the home” and manufacturers are providing a vast array of interesting options. The materials and colors are being mixed more now than ever. We see two and even three metals combined gracefully into one fixture as designers are getting more bold in their use of materials. 418 E. Cooper Ave., Suite 201, Aspen, 970.925.2252, KimRaymondArchitects.com

 

INDOOR-OUTDOOR CONNECTION 

John Rowland + Sarah Broughton

Rowland + Broughton

 

Courtesy Rowland + Broughton

Search “biophilia” and you’ll find references as far afield as Icelandic singer Björk’s album by that name, exploring the links between nature, music, and technology. Go deeper, and you’ll discover that psychoanalyst Erich Fromm popularized the term in the 1960s, coining “bio,” meaning “life” and “philia,” meaning “friendly feeling toward,” to describe the biological drive toward self-preservation. In the late 1970s, American biologist Edward O. Wilson expanded on the meaning, using it to describe “the rich natural pleasure that comes from being surrounded by living organisms.” Now you’ll find explanations and ruminations about biophilia as it relates to architecture and interior design today. Design firms worldwide, including Rowland + Broughton, are emphasizing the importance of connecting with the natural environment in their work. Encouraging personal well being by strengthening the indoor-outdoor connection in homes has become second nature, shall we say. Establishing an environment that is pleasing to the eye, soothing to the psyche, and physically comforting. As a concept, biophilic design may incorporate numerous elements and practices, such as: 

  • Providing direct connections to the outdoors via panoramic bifold door systems, terraces and decks
  • Encouraging natural light through well-positioned windows, doors and skylights
  • Utilizing natural materials, finishes and furnishings
  • Incorporating the element of water by integrating natural streams or ponds, or designing water features and/or pools
  • Incorporating the warming element of fire with the addition of fireplaces or firepits
  • Creating abundant green areas, such as outdoor gardens and greenhouses or indoor living walls

The end result; healthy lifestyles, nurturing environments. 500 W. Main St., Aspen, 970.544.9006, RowlandandBroughton.com

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